2012-11-28

Creating a Company Culture that Thrills Customers at WP Engine

Jason Cohen – Creating a Company Culture that Thrills Customers at WP Engine:

“You can train someone how DNS works, but you can’t train someone to naturally have empathy for a customer.

[…] Driving this completely home, looping in the points above, we won’t be successful if we say, “We want revenues to go up, therefore we’ll make customers happy.” Rather, we’ll be successful if we say, “We want customers to be successful, and we trust that revenue will go up as a side-effect.”

If you can’t train attitude, then you have to hire for attitude.”

Wed, 28 Nov 2012 11:52:20 +0000
2012-11-19

Michael Lopp: Stables and Volatiles

Michael Lopp – Stables and Volatiles:

“Your Stables are there to remind you about reality and to define process whereby large groups of people can be coordinated to actually get work done. Your Stables bring predictability, repeatability, credibility to your execution, and you need to build a world where they can thrive.

Your Volatiles are there to remind you that nothing lasts, and that the world is full of Volatiles who consider it their mission in life to replace the inefficient, boring, and uninspired. You can’t actually build them a world because they’ll think you’re up to something Stable, so you need to create a corner of the building where they can disrupt.”

Mon, 19 Nov 2012 10:01:33 +0000
2012-11-06

On Being A Senior Engineer

John Allspaw – On Being A Senior Engineer:

“In any project, the designers, product managers, operations engineers, developers, and business development folks all have goals and perspectives, and mature engineers realize that those goals and views may be different. They understand this so that they can navigate effectively in the work that they do. Being empathetic in this sense means having the ability to view the project from another person’s perspective and to take that into consideration into your own work.

Goal conflicts are inherent in all engineering work, and complaining about them (instead of embracing them as requirements for success) is a sign of a less mature engineer.”

Tue, 06 Nov 2012 22:29:15 +0000
2012-11-05

Why do people let themselves get overwhelmed at work?

David Allen – Why do people let themselves get overwhelmed at work?:

“People tend to both over-commit and to be inefficient. Few people know exactly how much work they actually have, and therefore must take everything on that they think about and that others ask them to do.”

(Via Jack Vinson.)

Mon, 05 Nov 2012 21:20:52 +0000

Attitude Matters Too

Eric Steven Raymond in The Art of Unix Programming – Attitude Matters Too:

“When you see the right thing, do it — this may look like more work in the short term, but it's the path of least effort in the long run. If you don't know what the right thing is, do the minimum necessary to get the job done, at least until you figure out what the right thing is.

[…] You have to believe that software design is a craft worth all the intelligence, creativity, and passion you can muster. Otherwise you won't look past the easy, stereotyped ways of approaching design and implementation; you'll rush into coding when you should be thinking. You'll carelessly complicate when you should be relentlessly simplifying — and then you'll wonder why your code bloats and debugging is so hard.

[…] To do the Unix philosophy right, you need to have (or recover) that attitude. You need to care. You need to play. You need to be willing to explore.”

Mon, 05 Nov 2012 09:50:33 +0000